The Electrical Compliance Certificate

Who is responsible for providing an Electrical Compliance Certificate?

The process to approval for extending a Sectional Title Unit

It is the Seller’s responsibility to hand a valid Electrical Compliance Certificate (ECC) to the Purchaser, unless otherwise agreed between the parties.

A valid ECC must not be older than 2 years, subject that no changes to the electrical installation has been made in the 2 year period.

Should the Agreement of Sale provide for a new certificate to be issued, the seller will have to provide a new one although he may be in possession of one younger than 2 years.

It is important to note that the ECC merely states that the electrical installation is safe and not necessarily that same is in working order.  However, few electricians will issue an ECC if they cannot test all the electrical installations in the property.  Therefore the cost of the ECC may be much higher than anticipated if it includes work to be done to fix faulty wires / equipment.

Recommended for you

Property Blog Articles | Advice | Contractual Matters | Market News
Legislative Guidelines

SPLUMA certificates required for property transfers in Mpumalanga[post_view before=""]

SPLUMA stands for the Spatial Planning and Land Use Management Act, and SPLUMA certificates are governed by the act together with the by-laws of each local municipality.

Read More
My name has changed - what happens to my property’s title deed?
Legislative Guidelines

Trust investments and the Legal Practice Act[post_view before=""]

The Legal Practice Act, which has replaced the Attorneys Act, has made some changes regarding monies paid into attorney trust accounts and the investment of this money on a client’s instructions.

Read More
Historical monuments and renovation restrictions
Legislative Guidelines

Destruction of a sectional title scheme: precautionary steps to take[post_view before=""]

There are several reasons why a landowner or developer may decide to build a new development in the place of an existing sectional title scheme. For example, the existing scheme may be dated and no longer suited to the area. Or the demand for residential units may be very high but the old development is undesirable.

Read More
My name has changed - what happens to my property’s title deed?
Legislative Guidelines

21 facts you should know about the POPI Act[post_view before=""]

On 1 July 2021, the Protection Of Personal Information Act 4 of 2013 (POPI Act) comes into full force and effect. While the Act was signed into law on 19 November 2013, the majority of its sections were only implemented on 1 July 2020, with a one-year grace period. Now, with the remaining sections coming into effect on 30 June 2021, the Act becomes enforceable by the Regulator.

Read More
Minors and immovable property
Legislative Guidelines

Court ruling: Can you sell a property that’s not in your name?[post_view before=""]

The recent judgement in the matter of Tomlinson and Another v Tomlinson N.O and Others (11764/2015) [2021] ZAKZDHC 8 (19 March 2021) in the Kwazulu-Natal High Court, Durban has drawn attention to whether someone is able to sell a property if he or she is not the registered owner.

Read More

Need more Snymans content?

Sign up for our monthly newsletter.

The Electrical Compliance Certificate

Who is responsible for providing an Electrical Compliance Certificate?

The process to approval for extending a Sectional Title Unit

It is the Seller’s responsibility to hand a valid Electrical Compliance Certificate (ECC) to the Purchaser, unless otherwise agreed between the parties.

A valid ECC must not be older than 2 years, subject that no changes to the electrical installation has been made in the 2 year period.

Should the Agreement of Sale provide for a new certificate to be issued, the seller will have to provide a new one although he may be in possession of one younger than 2 years.

It is important to note that the ECC merely states that the electrical installation is safe and not necessarily that same is in working order.  However, few electricians will issue an ECC if they cannot test all the electrical installations in the property.  Therefore the cost of the ECC may be much higher than anticipated if it includes work to be done to fix faulty wires / equipment.