Properties using borehole water must display a sign

Due to a significantly dry winter across the country, and many dams being alarmingly low, severe water restrictions have been implemented in most regions.

The process to approval for extending a Sectional Title Unit

Both the City of Cape Town and City of Johannesburg Municipalities have instituted Level 2 restrictions, meaning a 20% reduction in consumption, in an attempt to prevent the declaration of a disaster zone as has been done elsewhere in the country.

This means that water usage is limited, particularly for uses that are considered non-essential, such as watering gardens and washing cars.

While the same restrictions do not always apply to those residents making use of borehole water rather than municipal water, everyone is encouraged to reduce water usage and to follow the restriction guidelines.

Should a resident or property owner be making use of borehole water, this should be indicated on a sign on the outside of the property, clearly visible to the public thoroughfare. The necessary signage is available through the relevant municipality upon registration of your borehole, which is a municipal requirement.

If you are uncertain about the days and times at which you are allowed to water your garden, as well as additional regulations regarding water restrictions that you should be aware of, visit the relevant municipality website for details.

‪#‎AskSnymans‬ your property-related legal questions on Facebook.

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Properties using borehole water must display a sign

Due to a significantly dry winter across the country, and many dams being alarmingly low, severe water restrictions have been implemented in most regions.

The process to approval for extending a Sectional Title Unit

Both the City of Cape Town and City of Johannesburg Municipalities have instituted Level 2 restrictions, meaning a 20% reduction in consumption, in an attempt to prevent the declaration of a disaster zone as has been done elsewhere in the country.

This means that water usage is limited, particularly for uses that are considered non-essential, such as watering gardens and washing cars.

While the same restrictions do not always apply to those residents making use of borehole water rather than municipal water, everyone is encouraged to reduce water usage and to follow the restriction guidelines.

Should a resident or property owner be making use of borehole water, this should be indicated on a sign on the outside of the property, clearly visible to the public thoroughfare. The necessary signage is available through the relevant municipality upon registration of your borehole, which is a municipal requirement.

If you are uncertain about the days and times at which you are allowed to water your garden, as well as additional regulations regarding water restrictions that you should be aware of, visit the relevant municipality website for details.

‪#‎AskSnymans‬ your property-related legal questions on Facebook.