Back off my boundary!

When considering renovations to a property, there are typically requirements in place that stipulate how far a building must be from a road or a boundary wall.

Property Blog Articles | Advice | Contractual Matters | Market News

Regulations regarding the building and renovation of properties vary from municipality to municipality and are dealt with by the Town Planning or Building Department. The specific values of the required distances between buildings and boundaries will vary slightly based on the local by-laws and the details should be obtained from the local council. In some cases, there is no minimum distance in which case a building can be erected right on the boundary line, while in other situations, a building must be three metres or more from the boundary.

It is important to remember that any building or renovation should be approved before any work is commenced to avoid costly and time-consuming delays or changes.

In addition, it must be noted that the requirements and regulations will depend on a number of factors. These include the building type (e.g. whether the building is a residential home, an out-building, or a garage), the zoning of the property (e.g. whether the building is for residential or commercial use) and any special allowances applied for and approved (e.g. whether the owner applied to build closer to the boundary wall than typically allowed and this was agreed to by the neighbours and approved by the council).

This information is freely available from the relevant council and it is recommended that anyone looking at building or extending a structure access this information before proceeding with any plans.

Follow Snymans on Facebook for more legal advice, information and news about property.

1915

Recommended for you

Property Blog Articles | Advice | Contractual Matters | Market News
Legislative Guidelines

The role of a Transfer Attorney in South Africa

1550

Many sellers and buyers, particularly those embarking on their first property purchase, may not be entirely clear on what a transfer attorney is or what their role is in the property transfer process. Since a transfer attorney or conveyancer plays such a significant part in the process, we’ve outlined some of the key points that buyers and sellers should be aware of.

Read More
Property Transfers | Bond Registrations | Snymans Attorneys
Legislative Guidelines

Buying property through a company – taking up shares

2923

While many of us are more familiar with situations where a property is purchased by an individual or individuals (classified as natural persons), it is also possible for a property to be purchased in the name of a legal entity, most commonly a company.

Read More
Property Blog Articles | Advice | Contractual Matters | Market News
Legislative Guidelines

Lost original title deeds and bonds

8791

Should an original title deed or bond get lost, here’s the process that needs to be followed as per the latest amendments to Regulation 68 of the Deeds Registries Act 47/1937, published on 25 January 2019.

Read More
Property Blog Articles | Advice | Contractual Matters | Market News
Legislative Guidelines

Legal Practice Act to regulate client engagement in the legal practice

12587

The process regulating client engagement has been amended in terms of the Legal Practice Act, 28 of 2014 (LPA), effective as of 1 November 2018, to ensure greater transparency.

Read More
Legislative Guidelines

Historical municipal debt

15088

Prior to the landmark decision in Jordaan and Others v City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality and Others [2017] there was some uncertainty around debts incurred by previous owners of a property.

Read More

Need more Snymans content?

Sign up for our monthly newsletter.

Back off my boundary!

When considering renovations to a property, there are typically requirements in place that stipulate how far a building must be from a road or a boundary wall.

Property Blog Articles | Advice | Contractual Matters | Market News

Regulations regarding the building and renovation of properties vary from municipality to municipality and are dealt with by the Town Planning or Building Department. The specific values of the required distances between buildings and boundaries will vary slightly based on the local by-laws and the details should be obtained from the local council. In some cases, there is no minimum distance in which case a building can be erected right on the boundary line, while in other situations, a building must be three metres or more from the boundary.

It is important to remember that any building or renovation should be approved before any work is commenced to avoid costly and time-consuming delays or changes.

In addition, it must be noted that the requirements and regulations will depend on a number of factors. These include the building type (e.g. whether the building is a residential home, an out-building, or a garage), the zoning of the property (e.g. whether the building is for residential or commercial use) and any special allowances applied for and approved (e.g. whether the owner applied to build closer to the boundary wall than typically allowed and this was agreed to by the neighbours and approved by the council).

This information is freely available from the relevant council and it is recommended that anyone looking at building or extending a structure access this information before proceeding with any plans.

Follow Snymans on Facebook for more legal advice, information and news about property.

1915