Back off my boundary!

When considering renovations to a property, there are typically requirements in place that stipulate how far a building must be from a road or a boundary wall.

Property Blog Articles | Advice | Contractual Matters | Market News

Regulations regarding the building and renovation of properties vary from municipality to municipality and are dealt with by the Town Planning or Building Department. The specific values of the required distances between buildings and boundaries will vary slightly based on the local by-laws and the details should be obtained from the local council. In some cases, there is no minimum distance in which case a building can be erected right on the boundary line, while in other situations, a building must be three metres or more from the boundary.

It is important to remember that any building or renovation should be approved before any work is commenced to avoid costly and time-consuming delays or changes.

In addition, it must be noted that the requirements and regulations will depend on a number of factors. These include the building type (e.g. whether the building is a residential home, an out-building, or a garage), the zoning of the property (e.g. whether the building is for residential or commercial use) and any special allowances applied for and approved (e.g. whether the owner applied to build closer to the boundary wall than typically allowed and this was agreed to by the neighbours and approved by the council).

This information is freely available from the relevant council and it is recommended that anyone looking at building or extending a structure access this information before proceeding with any plans.

Follow Snymans on Facebook for more legal advice, information and news about property.

1977

Recommended for you

Legislative Guidelines

The Electronic Deeds Registration Act

3341

The Electronic Deeds Registration System Act 2019 and the Property Practitioners Act of 2019 (repealing the Estate Agencies Affairs Act 112 of 1976) were signed into law by his Excellency the State President on 2 October 2019.

Read More
Property Blog Articles | Advice | Contractual Matters | Market News
Legislative Guidelines

Money laundering and the Financial Intelligence Centre Act

4364

The sale of a property and the transfer of ownership along with the transfer of significant funds opens itself up to fraudulent activity which is why it is important to familiarise yourself with the risks surrounding money laundering and how the Financial Intelligence Centre Act aims to protect citizens.

Read More
Property Blog Articles | Advice | Contractual Matters | Market News
Legislative Guidelines

Amendments to the Financial Intelligence Centre Act (FICA)

8325

FICA is the Financial Intelligence Centre Act, 2001 as amended by the FIC Amendment Act 1 of 2017 which amendments came into operation on 2 April 2018.

Read More
Property Transfers | Bond Registrations | Snymans Attorneys
Legislative Guidelines

Subdivision of agricultural land

8515

There are several contexts in which it is necessary or desirable to subdivide agricultural land. Commonly, this happens when an individual wishes to leave property to his or her children through a will. While according to South African law, a testator may dispose of their property in any way he or she sees fit, there are certain limitations when it comes to subdividing agricultural land.

Read More
Property Transfers | Bond Registrations | Snymans Attorneys
Legislative Guidelines

4 reasons to subdivide your property

10276

Whether it’s about financially benefiting from land which you already own, splitting your assets between your children or simplifying your life by downsizing, there are a number of reasons why subdividing your property might be the right way to go.

Read More

Need more Snymans content?

Sign up for our monthly newsletter.

Back off my boundary!

When considering renovations to a property, there are typically requirements in place that stipulate how far a building must be from a road or a boundary wall.

Property Blog Articles | Advice | Contractual Matters | Market News

Regulations regarding the building and renovation of properties vary from municipality to municipality and are dealt with by the Town Planning or Building Department. The specific values of the required distances between buildings and boundaries will vary slightly based on the local by-laws and the details should be obtained from the local council. In some cases, there is no minimum distance in which case a building can be erected right on the boundary line, while in other situations, a building must be three metres or more from the boundary.

It is important to remember that any building or renovation should be approved before any work is commenced to avoid costly and time-consuming delays or changes.

In addition, it must be noted that the requirements and regulations will depend on a number of factors. These include the building type (e.g. whether the building is a residential home, an out-building, or a garage), the zoning of the property (e.g. whether the building is for residential or commercial use) and any special allowances applied for and approved (e.g. whether the owner applied to build closer to the boundary wall than typically allowed and this was agreed to by the neighbours and approved by the council).

This information is freely available from the relevant council and it is recommended that anyone looking at building or extending a structure access this information before proceeding with any plans.

Follow Snymans on Facebook for more legal advice, information and news about property.

1977